Artsbox Residencies 2019

Resident artists are often present at various times throughout the week, so why not pop by and see what they’re up to?

SarahClarkeArtsBox.jpg

Sarah Clarke

January 2019

It's the small events that make up a lifetime. Sarah Clarke, a local theatre maker and playwright, who explores the ways in which interviews, facts, reality and imagination collide in her latest work, The Court.  

During her residency in January 2019, Sarah aims to complete her draft and commence the editing phase, and hold a reading which will be open to the general public. 

 

Sarah_allen_Glenlyon_Studio.jpg

Sarah Allen

February to mid-March 2019

Sarah Allen is a local illustrator and artist, currently illustrating for children's publishers in the UK and Australia. In 2018, she worked from a bushland studio in Central Victoria and became fascinated by Australia's unique fauna and flora.  When she found herself googling "what's the difference between a kangaroo and wallaby?" an idea for children's book emerged.

During this residency, Sarah will explore and develop concepts and characters for a children's book pitch about Australian animals.  Do you know a quokka from a quoll? A bilby from a bettong? Sarah will invite the public into Artsbox to play games of animal recognition and meet the characters she creates.

 

WYNTER 300x200.jpg

Chantal Wynter

Mid-March to April 2019

Chantal will occupy Artsbox utilising it as a Vox Populi recording studio to develop a new series of works. Chantal will document Footscray through audio interviews, street conversations and sound. The lines of enquiry will be ‘what is Footscray to you?’. The fieldwork recordings will be a combination of direct questions to everyday conversations. Her project aims to document community voices and opinions represented by and for residents.

Chantal Wynter is a Melbourne based artist and creative producer who creates interdisciplinary work in collaboration with artists, arts organisations, galleries, festivals, educational institutions, community, Local Government and businesses. Chantal has extensive experience in developing, facilitating and delivering creative projects in a community context both small and large. Her interest lies in producing on-site encounters that combine mediums to express a subject or theme.

 

Yu Fang Chi 300x200.jpg

Yu-Fang Chi

May to mid-June 2019
Yu-Fang, Chi is a Taiwan-born, Melbourne based artist. Her practice involves repetitive fibre-related techniques which can be connected to traditional domestic art processes. Repetitive making processes such as stitching, weaving and crocheting connect Yu Fang to her cultural and familial lineage, while simultaneously heightening her awareness on the making process and the haptic sensibility of the materials.
 
During the Artsbox residency she plans to create a series of fibre-related, three-dimensional sculptures and objects. Drawing from the rhythm of weaving and the nature of intimate feminine relationships. Yu Fang aims to apply delicate metal wires and synthetic threads to respond to the ambiguous, unstable and shifting experience within the body.

 

 

Tegan Iversen 300x200.jpg

Tegan Iversen

Mid-June to July 2019
Tegan Iversen is a twenty-five-year-old artist & illustrator who creates fun, cute, happy & honest work. She makes paintings and digital art as well as lots of sweet little things like zines, prints, stickers, badges & patches.

Tegan has a Bachelor's Degree in Fine Arts, Visual Art (drawing) from the Victorian College of the Arts & currently co-runs F*EMS.  During her Artsbox residency Tegan will use the time to create a colouring book.

 

Miranda Hill 300x200.jpg

Miranda Hill

August 2019
Miranda Hill is a double bassist, producer, and educator based in Melbourne. Passionate about the capability of the arts to campaign for and support social justice campaigns, she is involved in community music leadership, as well as a professional performing career on modern and baroque double bass.

During the Artsbox residency, Miranda will be continuing her composition work with a project creating individual scores for Maribyrnong artists and residents, by conducting interviews and transcribing their words into graphic notation. These scores focus on images of performance anxiety and anxieties around creative careers.

Image credit: detail from score "FanYiShan", by Miranda Hill in collaboration with Dava Ffrog Wing.

 

Fury 300x200.jpg

Fury

September to October 2019
‘FAME DOES NOT EXIST is a four part comic series that looks to examine the social construct of fame. It seeks to highlight assumptions we make about power and capital in relation to public figures so we can better understand ourselves, those who represent us and the ways we create sustainable change.

FAME DOES NOT EXIST is a project by Fury, a non-binary, pakeha writer based in Narrm / Melbourne. Their work is interested in power. In particular, they are interested in family dynamics, the work place and the medical establishment. They work predominantly on the lands of the people of the Kulin Nation. They pay their respects to elders past, present and emerging.

 

Genevieve Butler 300x200.png

Genevieve Butler

November to mid-December 2019
Masks are worn by everybody every day; they help us and hinder us, some we remove, and some are stuck upon us. This summer you’re invited to poke your head in to Artsbox and have a yarn, discuss the current question (displayed in the window), to reflect and share.

During Genevieve’s residency she will make a multitude of half-masks, each of which will draw influence from discussions with passers-by and those that visit throughout her time in Artsbox.

Genevieve is a physical theatre practitioner specialising in character acting and storytelling. Her artistic practice explores the significance of social masks within theatrical frameworks and how these masks permit audiences to connect and relate universally to colloquial stories.

Once the masks are completed, the development of a new work will take place.  This work will be richly woven with influence from the Footscray Community. 

Image by: Jorge Serra